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Netflix Could Open A New Chapter For Streaming

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“We rely on transparency. We can’t control what we can’t see. We require persistent identity.” – Josef Kenik, “Anon,” K5 Films, 2018
In California, where we live, people bid on the average of seven homes before they finally get one they want/can afford.

When we visit Puerto Vallarta and see something we kinda like at the mercados, we’ll visit at least four stalls before mutually agreeing on a price we’re willing to pay … one we feel is good for us, good for them.

And that, my friends, is how most people choose their entertainment services.

O.K., there’s a segment of the viewing public that can only enjoy something if it is free (pirated) but there’s a pretty easy way to stop/slow the thieves. MESA (Media & Entertainment Services Alliance) has a whole group of folks who have developed solutions to protect content from beginning to end – https://tinyurl.com/4zp3rap2 – “because we want you to make it difficult for the ‘totally free’ folks.”

If those users dislike streamers capturing/using their info, what do they think the Torrent sites do? … jeezz!

As for the industry, we’ve never figured out why services brag about how many times a movie/series is pirated. It’s not only money out of their pockets but it also means the rest of us foot their bill!

Piracy costs streamers an estimated $30B plus every year and password sharing (freeloading) costs about $6B.

It’s not free advertising!

Every streaming service is saying enough is enough.

Despite Netflix’s miserable numbers for the 1st quarter, the bottom didn’t fall out of SVOD…far from it.

But SVOD has reached a point where it has to evolve.

No one really knows what the next phase will look like, but everyone has an opinion.

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Change – Netflix started the change in home entertainment back in ’97 when it bypassed the box stores to send folks DVDs direct to their home. Now it’s time for the next phase.
In August 1997, Netflix sent out its first red envelope (which started out white) and at their peak were sending out 12M DVDs a week.

In 2007, the company turned on the streaming spigot. Demand for new, unique content grew to 221M plus.

There are still 2M plus folks out there who want the envelope.

When they were “the only game in town,” studios fell all over themselves to have them distribute their film/series titles … until executives figured out they could do that too and make even more money.

In a little less three years, nearly all of the studios have reshaped their theatrical priorities and networks, moving from the day/time TV bundle to their own any time, any place, any screen service.

They all want to be the place where a subscriber will go so they can charge a fee based on “the value” of their content (translation … as much as they can get).

After all, $20/mo. is a lot less than the old $200/mo. subscribers used to pay for that overweight cable bundle.

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Content Spend – Consumers don’t just want movies and shows to watch; they want original content. People in different countries also want different content which has stimulated greater opportunities for content creators to develop material for home and abroad.
There are more than 300 SVOD/OTT services around the globe and that is expected to grow to 600 by 2025. All are focused on capturing their share of the 2B subscriber market by spending billions on “new, unique” content because … content is king.

Streaming investments led by Comcast, Disney and Netflix saw the global spend on content reach $220 billion in 2021 with the pot set to exceed $230 billion in 2022, according to a new report from Ampere Analysis.

In the US, 80 percent of TV households or 122.4M, have at least one SVOD service while the average number of services per household is four, according to Ampere Analysis.

In addition, the average churn rate is 35 percent.

Tough but tolerable.

Consumers will spend about $82.5B this year for subscription video content or $69.49 ARPU (average revenue per user).

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It’s Not One Form – Contrary to what some folks would like you to believe, the world isn’t all about streaming. In every country, there are a variety of ways people get their entertainment and that will continue.
But around the globe there are home/personal video entertainment options available that people can spend money on for ad–free services as well as less expensive and ad–supported services.

To entice folks to its service, Netflix set the bar high by signing multiyear contracts with leading content producers/developers and then funding/controlling the resulting projects.

That worked great by serving up popular shows like Ozark, Orange is the new Black, House of Cards, Stranger Things, The Crown and more. They’ve even shown the industry that regional shows have global audience appeal.

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Time for Change – Netflix, and the entire content distribution industry, has quietly tolerated people sharing SVOD passwords. However, it’s impacting everyone––even though folks have said, “hey if it wasn’t so easy, we’d change.” Now, it’s time to take back control.
Netflix took a page from Hollywood and bragged about how many Torrent downloads – free word of mouth advertising – projects it had.

They really wanted to recover some or all of that revenue but …

While Netflix has tiptoed around the password sharing issue for a long time, most recently by offering phased pricing for friends and family viewing.

The test program was a resounding failure coming at the same time the company increased monthly fees which after years of overlooking password sharing didn’t go over well … to say the least.

Went over like a lead balloon.

Long time content producers/servers like HBO Max, Disney, Hulu, Amazon, Apple have had password protection capabilities and enforcement from the outset, so password sharing is minimal and aggressively discouraged.

Netflix, the globe’s leading SVOD by a wide margin, invested heavily in local content development which has helped them grow nicely in 190 countries in regions like the EMEA (Europe, Middle East, Africa), SEA (Southeast Asia) and LatAm.

But the service has always been a lot like Henry Ford’s Model T observation, “You can have it in any color you want, as long as it is black,” or in their case, all the content at one set fee.

Have they been considering growth options?

Sure!

The most tangible action has been its video game acquisitions (Next Games, Night School, Boss Fight) to tap into the lucrative, constantly connected Gen Z (10–24 years) $6B download and streaming gaming market.

It has worked … the games have attracted the younger crowd to its platform and its shows.

But offering tiered pricing options is something Hastings has resisted for years.

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Oh Yeah – It’s fun – and deadly – to believe that people hate ads which is why they click away. But they don’t hate ads … they hate bad, moronic, boring, repetitive, sloppy ads.
Snobs have been drinking the Kool–Aid … people cut their cord to escape advertising.

BS! Study after study has proven that’s not the case.

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Bad, Too Many – Consumers have consistently said they are willing to exchange their time to watch ads with their content as long as there aren’t so many and that they’re relevant. All services and marketers have to do is listen/act.
We’re not a reverse snob but we like ads … good ads.

We don’t like 20 minutes of ads an hour.

We don’t like the same stupid ads again … and again … and again …

That’s probably why advertising exploration/explanation was such a hot topic at NAB (which we covered earlier); and Hastings is right … there’s a lot of work to be done! And people want choices.

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Value – People are clearly willing to watch good advertising along with their content as long as ads don’t dominate the content airtime.
But Hastings and Netflix now have the opportunity to take the lead again not only with the content creation industry and the consumer but, more importantly, in helping the ad folks clean up the crap and do things right.

Netflix has the richest (most valuable) database of global viewer information (followed closely by Amazon and Apple) which can be used by the company to educate, assist marketers in developing more effective ads, understanding the best balance of ads and how to create ads people interact with as much as they do with the firm’s entertainment content.

Much as advertisers would love to have access to that data, it shouldn’t be shared.

The company needs to use the information to help advertisers give viewers a better experience when they view and interact with the ads.

Of course, it starts by Hastings making good on one the company’s founding precepts – giving consumers choice.

Sure, it will undoubtedly be expensive in the short term as an unknown number of subscribers shift to the lower–cost options.

That will only give Wall Street yoyos who only a short time ago were pushing folks to buy their stock to say, “See, we told you they couldn’t do it.”

However, many will stick with their ad–free status, others will “adjust.”

More importantly, it will increase the number of people/households using the service and mitigate churn.

Hastings has already signaled that the company will examine its options over the next year or two and make decisions that are right for the content creation industry, global consumers and last, but not least, investors.

Turning the industry leader won’t be easy or free of pain but in putting a positive spin on the change of heart Netflix COO Greg Peters said adding ad tiers, “is an exciting opportunity for us.”

The ceiling for Netflix isn’t 222M subscribers.

The ceiling is really 1B plus folks around the globe who want their entertainment when they want it, where they want it and, on the screen they have in front of them.

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Market Share – Netflix has clearly established itself as the benchmark for watching original content around the world. It’s possible for the company to maintain that leadership and develop content delivery solutions that will satisfy everyone … including shareholders.
Tiered service options that include efficient, effective, intelligent ads will give folks the opportunity to watch what has clearly been the most sought–after content in a way that is budget friendly and treats them as intelligent individuals instead of targets.

Netflix has the data, infrastructure, experience and understanding of UI as well as recommendation and integration capabilities.

They offered something totally unique that people came to want/expect back in 2007; and now, they have a chance to do it again.

They enriched the content creation/distribution market before and now they have a chance to repeat it in the years ahead.

There was certainly plenty of interest at NAB on how content providers and marketers could improve the quality and effectiveness of advertising.

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Netflix might have the opportunity to take it to the next level.

The goal for everyone is to understand and interest folks, keeping in mind what the Girl in Anon said, “It’s not that I have something to hide. I have nothing I want you to see.”

Imagine getting ads in your content that you stick around to watch instead of running to the kitchen or bathroom.

It could happen, but it’s going to take time.

It’s not an end to original content creation, but it could improve ads.

Think about it … sitting there watching original content advertisements.

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Andy Marken – andy@markencom.com – is an author of more than 700 articles on management, marketing, communications, industry trends in media & entertainment, consumer electronics, software and applications. An internationally recognized marketing/communications consultant with a broad range of technical and industry expertise, especially in storage; storage management and film/video production fields; he has an extended range of relationships with business, industry trade press, online media and industry analysts/consultants.

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Businessuite News24 International

TELSTRA Officially Acquires DIGICEL PACIFIC

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TELSTRA, Australia’s leading telecommunications and technology company, today announced it has officially acquired Digicel Pacific in partnership with the Australian Government. Telstra will continue to invest in and operate the business across its six South Pacific markets – Papua New Guinea, Fiji, Nauru, Samoa, Tonga and Vanuatu.

Oliver Camplin-Warner, Telstra International CEO, said the deal was an exciting milestone for the Digicel Pacific business and its customers in Papua New Guinea.

“We’re very pleased to welcome Digicel Pacific into the Telstra family. The Digicel Pacific team in PNG have amazing local expertise and are leaders in digital experiences for their customers. Together, we’ll work to ensure Digicel Pacific remains the top provider in PNG,” he said.

Mr Camplin-Warner confirmed there would not be any local job losses in the Pacific as part of the acquisition and the current Digicel Pacific team would continue the day-to-day running of the business.

“Digicel Pacific will still have the same people and products that their PNG customers know and love today,” he said.

“Telstra will add to these strengths with our more than one hundred years’ experience building and operating the largest mobile network in Australia, and our operations in more than 20 countries world-wide.”

“As part of our commitment to building a strong and sustainable PNG, Digicel Pacific will invest in an additional 115 towers which will be built across PNG over the next two years,” Mr Camplin-Warner added.

“This investment will mean continued improvements to 4G coverage, particularly in rural areas, which will bring with it opportunities to improve health, education, agricultural, commerce and cultural outcomes through the use of technology.”

Colin Stone, CEO, Digicel Papua New Guinea, said Telstra’s expertise in rolling out world-class networks and connecting remote communities would greatly enhance the work to date of Digicel and benefit the people and businesses of PNG.

“Telstra has experience connecting regional and remote customers in challenging geographies across mountains, deserts, rainforests and coastlines,” Mr Stone said.

“We’re looking forward to Telstra applying its network experience as well as its innovation and technology solutions to PNG to continue increasing connectivity in the region as Digicel has been doing for the past 14 years.”

Mr Camplin-Warner said the values of both Telstra and Digicel Pacific were a natural fit, with the companies committed to working together to build a connected future for everyone.

“We strongly believe we are “better together”, and this includes how we both work to support some of the most vulnerable in our communities,” he said.

“Telstra strongly supports Digicel Pacific’s grass roots community investments through the Digicel Foundation, and we are committed to seeing this work continue.”

Photo: Collin Stone, Digicel PNG CEO

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Tiktok’s Battle-Tested Business Model, Unconventional In The West But Well-Practiced By Its Chinese Parent Bytedance.

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“There are several ways to measure TikTok’s success: It took just four years to reach 1 billion monthly users; its average user in the US spends more time with the service than with Facebook and Instagram put together; and its most popular video, an 18-second clip of someone flying on a magic broomstick, has claimed 2.2 billion views.

But what of TikTok’s moneymaking power? I wrote about the ways that the app’s operators are turning its popularity into a huge business in the latest issue of Bloomberg Businessweek. To rival and outdo social and ad giants like Meta Platforms Inc. and Alphabet Inc.’s Google, TikTok relies on a battle-tested business model that’s unconventional in the west but well-practiced by its Chinese parent ByteDance Ltd. Here’s a look at the ingredients.

At the core of TikTok’s appeal is Its Algorithm, the ability to discern a user’s likes and dislikes from their activity on the platform, picking up on how long you watch, say, a cat video or a cooking tutorial. The same model of content distribution is now being used on ads and sponsored content, helping TikTok serve more appealing ads and triple its ad revenue to an estimated $12 billion this year. Even Meta is now trying to rewrite the algorithms of Facebook and Instagram, so its services can surprise and delight people with videos they didn’t know they wanted to see. It’s a departure from Meta’s old approach of filling a user’s feed based on their social connections.

The other key thing is Branding. TikTok’s most lucrative ad accounts feature companies more interested in building their brands than stimulating direct sales. McDonald’s Corp., for instance, won’t count on TikTok to sell burgers, but it will likely want to use the platform to woo the young people using it. TikTok connects brands with influencers and helps them create viral challenges, goofy camera effects and immersive full-screen videos. That’s why its motto goes, “Don’t make ads. Make TikToks.”

On top of all that, TikTok is jumping into E-Commerce in ways that could challenge Amazon.com Inc. It’s rolled out an in-app marketplace in regions like Southeast Asia and the UK, where users can jump from live streams and short videos to shopping portals without friction. The idea is to create a closed loop where TikTok handles each and every step from a user discovering something to actually purchasing it — instead of directing them to an Amazon listing or a Shopify Inc.-powered web store.

To be sure, TikTok and ByteDance still have enormous challenges ahead. For one thing, commercial success across the globe demands navigating fragmented markets that don’t share the same culture, user preferences, regulations or tech infrastructure. And politics remains a big risk, even after TikTok survived President Donald Trump’s attempted ban. The perceived security threat from TikTok’s handling of US user data probably won’t go away as long as Beijing and Washington keep tussling in the geopolitics arena.”

Source: TikTok Turns On the Money Machine By Zheping Huang

 

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India Is Fast Emerging As A Global Leader In A New Type Of Online Retailing: Quick Commerce.

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Big investors including Google, Reliance Industries, and SoftBank Group have poured billions of dollars into startups promising to bring that next order of curry-ready chicken, cat food, or crunchy aloo bhujia chickpea snacks within minutes, rather than hours or days. Relying on discounts and free delivery to woo customers who make purchases through mobile apps, the companies fill orders at neighborhood warehouses called dark stores, then use algorithms to send drivers on the fastest routes through the crowded roads of Delhi, Mumbai, Bengaluru (formerly known as Bangalore), and other cities.

Although groceries sold online account for just 2% of all grocery retail sales in India, they’re one of the fastest-growing segments of commerce and are considered essential for anyone dreaming of dominating e-commerce. And in a country where food and daily necessities—categories tailor-made for get-it-now delivery—make up about two-thirds of the $1 trillion in annual retail spending, startups are wagering that quick commerce can change grocery shopping habits and make them rich in the process.

Source: Bloomberg

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-06-22/swiggy-zepto-power-india-s-ultrafast-grocery-delivery-boom?cmpid=BBD062322_TECH&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter&utm_term=220623&utm_campaign=tech

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Amazon Launches Buy with Prime, A Direct Threat To Shopify

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In April, Amazon unveiled the service, called Buy with Prime, currently available on an invite-only basis. It extends the familiar Prime brand to third-party websites and offers shipping through Amazon’s logistics network—exactly the piece that Shopify’s service is missing. It also threatens to supplant Shopify’s popular payment tool, Shop Pay, and undercut one of the company’s strengths in the eyes of Wall Street. “Buy with Prime is about the brand, and the price of that brand is Amazon Payments,” wrote Ben Thompson in his daily newsletter, Stratechery.

Source Brad Stone @ Bloomberg

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Shopify’s Lack Of Fulfilment Support Leaves Merchants On their Own

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Among the many issues now weighing on Shopify, is the matter of fulfilment.

Shopify helps merchants make online sales, but when it comes to storing and shipping their products, it either brokers deals with third-party warehouses and transportation companies or leaves the last mile entirely to the seller. When asked about this, founder-CEO Lütke admitted logistics “is a tough nut to crack for byte companies” and suggested Shopify would shy away from owning and operating Amazon-style warehouses.

But he’s in a tricky position. Shopify merchants need help delivering parcels quickly and reliably. At the same time, investors tremble at the massive expense of operating fulfillment centers and delivering packages.

Shopify merchants need help delivering parcels quickly and reliably.

Last month, the company said it was buying a fulfillment company called Deliverr Inc. for $2.1 billion, and merging its capabilities with a robotics company it had previously acquired, 6 River Systems.

Shopify’s stock is down 30% since news of the acquisition talks broke last month, far exceeding market-wide declines. Whatever it does, Shopify risks antagonizing either its customers or investors.

Source Brad Stone @Bloomberg

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